Making and Keeping Quality New Years Resolutions

By Monday January 6th, 2014Lifestyle, Miscellaneous

When you ‘play to win’ you’re driven by gain and advancement, ‘playing not to lose’, however, is about security. Let the situation be the guide.
–Heidi Grant Halvorson (http://hbr.org/product/nine-things-successful-people-do-differently/an/11065-PDF-ENG)

My focus the last few months were all about natural ways to distress and treat yourself for the holidays in ways that promote wellbeing. As the New Year approaches many of us are resolving to start a new and find ways to be “better” versions of our selves. For a lot of people the focus of the New Year is about loosing weight, eating better, exercising more and getting healthier. As you move into the New Year I want to bring some information that I have found valuable over the years, break through some nutritional myths, fend off the cold, and help you ring in a healthy, wholesome, and healing new year.

For starters here are a few tips for making AND keeping great New Year’s resolutions:

1.Setting and Achieving Goals.

a. Don’t just make a commitment to be healthier or more successful. According to Dr. Heidi Grant Halverson, studies show that setting goals that are more specific and tangible makes you more likely to achieve your goals. Instead of making your resolution something vague like I want to be healthier.  Try I will lower my cholesterol levels by 20 or 30 this year, I will to lose 5lbs by March, or I will eat 1 extra servings of greens and 1 extra serving of veggies everyday this year.

i. Set clear and concrete goals.
ii. Set specific goals.
iii. Set realistic goals.
iv. Set an end date for your goals.

2.Start Simple

a. Keep your New Years list to a minimum. Make a few goals and really focus on making those goals count.

3. For Your More Elaborate Resolutions

a. Break them down into smaller chunks and develop a plan that has small goals to achieve along the way.  Breaking down your resolution makes it more manageable and less overwhelming.  Remember, this is not an all or nothing deal. Every small step you make toward your longer-term goals is a valuable one. Try not to be hard on yourself, and don’t forget to celebrate your achievements along the way.

4. Letting Go of the Guilt & Shame

a. Celebrate your accomplishments instead of giving into your guilt and shame. Getting upset with yourself and making excuses to make you feel better about it is not a necessary evil.  You are amazing and beautiful, and capable of reaching your larger goal. If you slip up, let it go and keep focusing on the positive steps you’ve made. One cookie, or skipping out on your exercise for the day isn’t a big deal. Think about how much you’ve already done to reach your goals.

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